Civica
Financial intelligence for Asia's healthcare markets
 
 
Remember me:

Analysis: Expats and mental health

Mental health is a growing issue for expats; workers and their employers, as well as those relocating independently, according to a recent research study by Aetna International. Expatriate mental health: breaking the silence and ending the stigma, calls for businesses and individuals to take more pre-emptive action to combat the problem, to ensure expats have the vital support they need when relocating or working away from their home country.

A survey of 5,000 Aetna International members in 2016 revealed that that just 6% per cent of expats are concerned about mental health issues before relocating. The findings also suggest that since most expats have a mind-set open to risk and challenges, some of them may consequently be less likely to take steps to manage any potential issues in advance, not just for themselves, but their accompanying dependant family members as well.

“There are many challenges that expats face which can result in debilitating mental health issues if ignored,” said Derek Goldberg, managing director, Southeast Asia and Hong Kong, for Aetna. “Often, they have to adjust quickly to new and sometimes very different cultures, languages and work responsibilities, and without the usual social support networks back home,” he added. 

According to Aetna International member data between 2014-2016, mental health claims prevalence in Europe showed the greatest increase (33%), followed by the Middle East and Africa (28%), the Americas (26%) then Southeast Asia (19%). Half of respondents showed that depression emerged as the most prevalent condition, followed by anxiety with women between the ages of 30 and 49 were the most likely to seek treatment. 

“Part of the reason expats are more susceptible to mental health issues is the absence of the family and friends network they relied on for support back home,” said Aetna medical director Mitesh Patel. “We believe that employers should be taking a more preventive approach, introducing solutions such as employee assistance programmes.”

He continued: “At best, these not only tackle mental health concerns when they arise, but encourage broader employee wellness to address issues before they escalate. Similarly, expats relocating independently should also consider preparing for the challenges they may face and seeking support before and during their move. Increasing knowledge around mental health issues and the support available can change attitudes towards those with mental health, and the behaviour of those coping with issues.”

Posted on: 29/06/2017 UTC+08:00


News

Shares in Sisram Medical, a Israeli subsidiary of Shanghai Fosun Pharmaceutical, and which manufactures medical aesthetics devices, slumped on their Hong Kong Stock Exchange debut today. By late morning they were down more than 6%.
Auckland-based ehealth software company Orion Health has signed a five-year contract with Integrated Health Information Systems (IHiS), the health technology agency for Singapore.
Irish healthcare, IT and services company Clanwilliam Group has taken a majority shareholding in HealthLink, Australasia’s leading health-system integrator. Financial terms have not been disclosed.
Strategic initiatives and expansion have driven a rise in first quarter profits at iKang Healthcare Group, China’s largest private preventive healthcare services provider.
Optiscan Imaging, which develops microscopic imaging technologies for medical markets, has announced an exclusive distribution agreement with Chinese based China Gate Scientific for the newest Optiscan preclinical research system, ViewnVivo.
Contract genomics organisation WuXi NextCODE has appointed Rob Brainin as executive vice president and chief operating officer. Brainin joins the company from Illumina, where he was vice president and general manager of life sciences and applied genomics.
Melbourne-based medtech company Novita Healthcare has appointed Bruce Higgins as chairman. He is an experienced non- executive director, chairman and former chief executive of both private and listed companies within Australia and internationally, spanning over 25 years in diverse companies ranging from engineering, manufacturing and professional services to larger contracting businesses.
In what is another setback for Perth-based digital healthcare operator Resapp, Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders has decided not proceed with its planned field evaluation of the group’s software. ResApp’s main product is a cough-based diagnostic test that works with a smartphone to analyse the sound of a patient’s cough and to diagnose any underlying conditions.



Analysis

By 2042 there will be more over-65s in Asia than the populations of the Eurozone and North America combined. We look at the business opportunities this creates.
Albert Wong argues that biomedical technology should not be ignored and explains how the Hong Kong Science and Technology Parks Corporation can support it.
Jacob Pope explains why medical tourism remains one of the region’s most significant industries.
APACMed’s Fredrik Nyberg looks at how local and multinational IVD companies are developing novel solutions for Asia’s unique needs.
It is perhaps a curious line in the sand to draw, but the new hospital in Dunedin, the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, is gearing up to be a significant battle in the use of private-public partnership funding in the APAC region.
The ADB’s Eduardo Banzon argues that ASEAN countries need to guarantee the same health coverage for citizens when they are in foreign countries.
Mercer’s Catherine Li explains how companies in China can avoid common pitfalls when they establish employee health management programmes.
Lieven Jacquemyn, PPP international development director at GE Healthcare Singapore, discusses how governments, providers and investors can work together to bring universal health coverage to the region.


Civica

HealthInvestor Asia Summit

AON

Podcasts

Hedge Fund Focus

HealthInvestor Asia twitter feed
HIA Indices